Quit smoking

Start with Day One- You Can Quit – UConn Today – UConn Today

Summary

About 34 million American adults still smoke cigarettes, and smoking remains the single largest preventable cause of death and illness in the world. Smoking causes an estimated 480,000 deaths every year, or about 1 in 5 deaths.

Quitting smoking isn’t easy.

It takes time and a plan.  With 36 years in the field, developing clinical programs and evidence-based research, Judith Cooney PhD, health psychologist and associate professor of psychiatry at the UConn Health …….

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About 34 million American adults still smoke cigarettes, and smoking remains the single largest preventable cause of death and illness in the world. Smoking causes an estimated 480,000 deaths every year, or about 1 in 5 deaths.

Quitting smoking isn’t easy.

It takes time and a plan.  With 36 years in the field, developing clinical programs and evidence-based research, Judith Cooney PhD, health psychologist and associate professor of psychiatry at the UConn Health Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center helps cancer patients and survivors lead healthier lifestyles that include quitting smoking when diagnosed with cancer.

Tobacco smoke contains a deadly mix of more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds are toxic. About 70 can cause cancer.   Some of the chemicals in each cigarette include:

Cancer-Causing Chemicals in Cigarettes includes

  • Formaldehyde: Used to embalm dead bodies
  • Benzene: Found in gasoline
  • Polonium 210: Radioactive and very toxic
  • Vinyl chloride: Used to make pipes

Toxic Metals

  • Chromium: Used to make steel
  • Arsenic: Used in pesticides
  • Lead: Once used in paint
  • Cadmium: Used to make batteries

Poison Gases

  • Carbon monoxide: Found in car exhausts
  • Hydrogen cyanide: Used in chemical weapons
  • Ammonia: Used in household cleaners
  • Butane: Used in lighter fluid
  • Toluene: Found in paint thinners

Nicotine is an addictive substance in cigarettes. It acts fast but has a short half-life.  When an individual smokes, nicotine is rapidly absorbed and acts on the chemistry of the brain and central nervous system lead to increases in heart rate, blood pressure, endorphins, etc. This causes pleasant feelings and a sense of enhanced concentration, vigilance, and decreased anxiety and hunger.  After a few months of semi-regular smoking, our bodies develop tolerance to nicotine, and smokers need more nicotine to have the same effects.  Reaching the brain within seconds after taking a puff, its effects start to wear off within two hours.  The user may experience nicotine withdrawal, and feel irritated and edgy, this is what leads to the person having another cigarette.  This cycle continues.  If the person doesn’t smoke again soon, withdrawal symptoms get worse over time and as the body adapts to nicotine, they increase the amount of tobacco they use.

The risks of smoking are well known, smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to develop heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer. It causes diminished overall health, increased absenteeism from work, and increased health care utilization and cost.

Smoking causes about 20% of all cancers and about 30% of all cancer deaths in the United States.

About 80% of lung cancers, as well as about 80% of all lung cancer deaths, are due to smoking. Smoking, however just doesn’t cause lung cancer, it also increases the risk for other cancers including the mouth, head, and neck, esophagus, kidney, cervix, liver, bladder, pancreas, stomach, and colon.

Smoke damage …….

Source: https://today.uconn.edu/2021/11/start-with-day-one-you-can-quit/