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12 myths about IBD – Medical News Today

Summary

IBD is a condition that affects the gastrointestinal system. The symptoms often include abdominal cramps, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea.

The symptoms can fluctuate and may last for days, weeks, or months at a time. In 2015, an estimated 3 million people in the United States had IBD.

Globally, the disease affected an estimated 6.8 million people in 2017.

The most common forms of IBD are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Both involve chronic inflammation of the…….

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IBD is a condition that affects the gastrointestinal system. The symptoms often include abdominal cramps, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea.

The symptoms can fluctuate and may last for days, weeks, or months at a time. In 2015, an estimated 3 million people in the United States had IBD.

Globally, the disease affected an estimated 6.8 million people in 2017.

The most common forms of IBD are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Both involve chronic inflammation of the digestive tract.

Despite the relatively high prevalence of IBD, a great deal of misinformation and misunderstanding surrounds it.

Here, we fight fiction with facts. To aid us on our quest, we have enlisted the help of Dr. Abhik Bhattacharya, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY.

IBD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) both affect the digestive system and have similar acronyms. This, perhaps, explains some of the confusion. However, the two conditions are not the same.

Dr. Bhattacharya explained to Medical News Today that IBS “is a disorder of the interaction between the gut and brain, leading to diarrhea, constipation, or both, along with bloating and pain. [It] can be worsened or precipitated by stress and anxiety.”

Conversely, he continued, IBD “is a disease of a dysregulated immune system, wherein the immune system starts attacking your own gastrointestinal system, leading to damage.”

“The disease can lead to stress, worsening anxiety, depression, and loss of sleep because of the devastating consequences it can have on a person’s daily functioning,” he said. “Symptoms can include bleeding in stools, diarrhea, severe belly pain, unintentional weight loss, fevers, chills, rectal pain, fatigue, and more.”

IBD is driven by the immune system, so stress is not the direct cause. However, as Dr. Bhattacharya explained, it “can make life very stressful.”

Stress can trigger IBD flares and exacerbate the symptoms in some people, which might help explain the confusion. However, stress does not cause IBD.

Some small, decades-old studies have investigated the links between personality traits and IBD. However, when MNT asked Dr. Bhattacharya whether there are any links between a person’s character and IBD, he put it succinctly: “There are none that we know about.”

Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis are the most common forms of IBD. However, they are distinct conditions, and people cannot have both.

“You can either have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis,” said …….

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/medical-myths-all-about-ibd